kevin w murphy
cinephiliabeyond:

Go behind the scenes of one of Bill Forsyth’s masterpieces, Local Hero  (1983) and meet the writer and director himself. Plus, legend Burt Lancaster, who plays the lead role Happer, talk business. Huge thanks to Doug Weir for this rare gem. The DVD of the film is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

Writer-director Bill Forsyth said in Local Hero: The Making of the Film (1983) by Alan Hunter and Mark Astaire: “I saw it along the lines of a Scottish Beverly Hillbillies — what would happen to a small community when it suddenly became immensely rich — that was the germ of the idea and the story built itself from there. It seemed to contain a similar theme to Brigadoon (1954), which also involved some Americans coming over to Scotland, becoming part of a small community, being changed by the experience and affecting the place in their own way. I feel close in spirit to the Powell and Pressburger feeling, the idea of trying to present a cosmic viewpoint to people, but through the most ordinary things. And because both this film and I Know Where I’m Going! (1945) are set in Scotland, I’ve felt from the beginning that we’re walking the same… treading the same water.”


In his review in the Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert gave the film his highest four stars, calling it “a small film to treasure.” He gave particular praise to writer-director Bill Forsyth for his abilities as a storyteller:

What makes this material really work is the low-key approach of the writer-director, Bill Forsyth, who also made the charming Gregory’s Girl and has the patience to let his characters gradually reveal themselves to the camera. He never hurries, and as a result, Local Hero never drags: Nothing is more absorbing than human personalities, developed with love and humor. Some of the payoffs in this film are sly and subtle, and others generate big laughs. Forsyth’s big scenes are his little ones, including a heartfelt, whiskey-soaked talk between the American and the innkeeper, and a scene where the visitors walk on the beach and talk about the meaning of life. By the time Burt Lancaster reappears at the end of the film, to personally handle the negotiations with old Ben, Local Hero could hardly have anything but a happy ending. But it’s a fairly close call. —Roger Ebert


For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// 

This movie remains one of my favorite comedies of all time. It’s a beautiful film, funny, sad, transcendent, meditative, and it has slapstick and a Russian fisherman singing a cowboy song. 

cinephiliabeyond:

Go behind the scenes of one of Bill Forsyth’s masterpieces, Local Hero  (1983) and meet the writer and director himself. Plus, legend Burt Lancaster, who plays the lead role Happer, talk business. Huge thanks to Doug Weir for this rare gem. The DVD of the film is available at Amazon and other online retailers.

Writer-director Bill Forsyth said in Local Hero: The Making of the Film (1983) by Alan Hunter and Mark Astaire: “I saw it along the lines of a Scottish Beverly Hillbillies — what would happen to a small community when it suddenly became immensely rich — that was the germ of the idea and the story built itself from there. It seemed to contain a similar theme to Brigadoon (1954), which also involved some Americans coming over to Scotland, becoming part of a small community, being changed by the experience and affecting the place in their own way. I feel close in spirit to the Powell and Pressburger feeling, the idea of trying to present a cosmic viewpoint to people, but through the most ordinary things. And because both this film and I Know Where I’m Going! (1945) are set in Scotland, I’ve felt from the beginning that we’re walking the same… treading the same water.”

In his review in the Chicago Sun-Times, Roger Ebert gave the film his highest four stars, calling it “a small film to treasure.” He gave particular praise to writer-director Bill Forsyth for his abilities as a storyteller:

What makes this material really work is the low-key approach of the writer-director, Bill Forsyth, who also made the charming Gregory’s Girl and has the patience to let his characters gradually reveal themselves to the camera. He never hurries, and as a result, Local Hero never drags: Nothing is more absorbing than human personalities, developed with love and humor. Some of the payoffs in this film are sly and subtle, and others generate big laughs. Forsyth’s big scenes are his little ones, including a heartfelt, whiskey-soaked talk between the American and the innkeeper, and a scene where the visitors walk on the beach and talk about the meaning of life. By the time Burt Lancaster reappears at the end of the film, to personally handle the negotiations with old Ben, Local Hero could hardly have anything but a happy ending. But it’s a fairly close call. —Roger Ebert

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

This movie remains one of my favorite comedies of all time. It’s a beautiful film, funny, sad, transcendent, meditative, and it has slapstick and a Russian fisherman singing a cowboy song. 

Rifftrax | Independence Day (1996)

This was fun. And long. And fun.

paulftompkins:

I thoroughly enjoyed this. Happy Independence Day, my fellow Americans!

paulftompkins:

#tbt to that time I lost all the hair on my head and face and had to have my scalp opened up to mine for more. Oh, and watch Comedy Bang Bang tonight if you like Werner Herzog.

Oh, I will.  I WILL. 

lastowka:

Just TWO WEEKS until our first RiffTrax Live event of the year, SHARKNADO!
For those of you wondering, YES, I am preparing an extended John Hurt/John Heard/William Hurt skit for the intro. I’m talking seriously extended. We may need to trim the movie.
Showtimes and tickets HERE!

I’m guessing this sketch will go on a good hour, in two acts.

lastowka:

Just TWO WEEKS until our first RiffTrax Live event of the year, SHARKNADO!

For those of you wondering, YES, I am preparing an extended John Hurt/John Heard/William Hurt skit for the intro. I’m talking seriously extended. We may need to trim the movie.

Showtimes and tickets HERE!

I’m guessing this sketch will go on a good hour, in two acts.

The Boomer, in repose.

The Boomer, in repose.

sarabenincasa:

Please help me help gay teens via comedy, books, fun and a big ol’ KICKSTARTER TOUR! Only 5 days left to raise my goal!

I’m beginning to think that Google’s image search technology needs a bit of work. @kwmurphy: @XcelEnergyMN Tree ON POWER LINE 50 Norman Ridge Dr Bloomington 55437 VERY dangerous, please attend to it ASAP. http://t.co/vYcGDZb32D

I’m beginning to think that Google’s image search technology needs a bit of work. 

@kwmurphy: @XcelEnergyMN Tree ON POWER LINE 50 Norman Ridge Dr Bloomington 55437 VERY dangerous, please attend to it ASAP. http://t.co/vYcGDZb32D

geardrops:

world cup is so good this year you guys

"Define ‘goal!’ Define ‘goal’ dammit!" 

paulftompkins:

Season 2 of “No, YOU Shut Up!” wrapped today. What a joy it was to work with so many insanely talented people. Thank you for making me break on national television! #NoYOUShutUp (at Univision Canal 34)

paulftompkins:

Season 2 of “No, YOU Shut Up!” wrapped today. What a joy it was to work with so many insanely talented people. Thank you for making me break on national television! #NoYOUShutUp (at Univision Canal 34)