kevin w murphy
cinephiliabeyond:


There is an old story of how the cathedral of Chartres was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. Then thousands of people came from all points of the compass, like a giant procession of ants, and together they began to rebuild the cathedral on its old site. They worked until the building was completed—master builders, artists, laborers, clowns, noblemen, priests, and burghers. But they all remained anonymous, and no one knows to this day who built the cathedral of Chartres. Regardless of my own beliefs and my own doubts, which are unimportant in this connection, it is my opinion that art lost its basic creative drive the moment it was separated from worship. It severed an umbilical cord and now lives its own sterile life, generating and degenerating itself. In former days the artist remained unknown and his work was to the glory of God. He lived and died without being more or less important than other artisans; “eternal values,” “immortality” and “masterpiece” were terms not applicable in his case. The ability to create was a gift. In such a world flourished invulnerable assurance and natural humility.
Today the individual has become the highest form and the greatest bane of artistic creation. The smallest wound or pain of the ego is examined under a microscope as if it were of eternal importance. The artist considers his isolation, his subjectivity, and his individualism almost holy. Thus we finally gather in one large pen, where we stand and bleat about our loneliness without listening to each other and without realizing that we are smothering each other to death. The individualists stare into each other’s eyes and yet deny the existence of each other. We walk in circles, so limited by our own anxieties that we can no longer distinguish between true and false, between the gangster’s whim and the purest ideal. Thus if I am asked what I would like the general purpose of my films to be, I would reply that I want to be one of the artists in the cathedral on the great plain. I want to make a dragon’s head, an angel, a devil—or perhaps a saint—out of stone. It does not matter which; it is the sense of satisfaction that counts. Regardless of whether I believe or not, whether I am a Christian or not, I would play my part in the collective building of the cathedral. —Ingmar Bergman, Four Screenplays via oldhollywood


In case you somehow missed it: this is just absolutely brilliant and by far the best interview with Ingmar Bergman I’ve ever come across: Ingmar Bergman: a conversation with the students of the American Film Institute. In addition to this, I would also recommend George Stevens Jr.’s marvelous book, Conversations with the Great Moviemakers of Hollywood’s Golden Age: At the American Film Institute.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

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cinephiliabeyond:

There is an old story of how the cathedral of Chartres was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. Then thousands of people came from all points of the compass, like a giant procession of ants, and together they began to rebuild the cathedral on its old site. They worked until the building was completed—master builders, artists, laborers, clowns, noblemen, priests, and burghers. But they all remained anonymous, and no one knows to this day who built the cathedral of Chartres. Regardless of my own beliefs and my own doubts, which are unimportant in this connection, it is my opinion that art lost its basic creative drive the moment it was separated from worship. It severed an umbilical cord and now lives its own sterile life, generating and degenerating itself. In former days the artist remained unknown and his work was to the glory of God. He lived and died without being more or less important than other artisans; “eternal values,” “immortality” and “masterpiece” were terms not applicable in his case. The ability to create was a gift. In such a world flourished invulnerable assurance and natural humility.

Today the individual has become the highest form and the greatest bane of artistic creation. The smallest wound or pain of the ego is examined under a microscope as if it were of eternal importance. The artist considers his isolation, his subjectivity, and his individualism almost holy. Thus we finally gather in one large pen, where we stand and bleat about our loneliness without listening to each other and without realizing that we are smothering each other to death. The individualists stare into each other’s eyes and yet deny the existence of each other. We walk in circles, so limited by our own anxieties that we can no longer distinguish between true and false, between the gangster’s whim and the purest ideal. Thus if I am asked what I would like the general purpose of my films to be, I would reply that I want to be one of the artists in the cathedral on the great plain. I want to make a dragon’s head, an angel, a devil—or perhaps a saint—out of stone. It does not matter which; it is the sense of satisfaction that counts. Regardless of whether I believe or not, whether I am a Christian or not, I would play my part in the collective building of the cathedral. —Ingmar Bergman, Four Screenplays via oldhollywood

In case you somehow missed it: this is just absolutely brilliant and by far the best interview with Ingmar Bergman I’ve ever come across: Ingmar Bergman: a conversation with the students of the American Film Institute. In addition to this, I would also recommend George Stevens Jr.’s marvelous book, Conversations with the Great Moviemakers of Hollywood’s Golden Age: At the American Film Institute.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

Please consider our latest offering, THE LAST SLUMBER PARTY, as it may be the stupidest teen horror film I have ever seen, and that’s a considerable statement. This may well be the slasher-pic equivalent of “The Room.” 

A madman terrorizes a slumber party. Maybe two. He (or they) does (do) it slowly, haltingly, ineptly. Lines are flubbed, shots lose focus, marks are missed, no matter, the camera bravely marches on.  And it ends as pointlessly as it begins.

So it all adds up to great viewing for a summer night, under the stars, in the cabin, Hell, even on the phone.  See it with someone you love, because anyone else might hit you.

mattgourley:

SUPEREGO IS BACK! AND PACKED WITH ACTION-SATISFACTION!

And what’s more, we’re bringing Paul F. Tompkins with us. That’s right, he’s joining the Superego Clinic For Analytical Pscience™ as a regular member. It’s time you got ready to get ready.

But that’s only the half of it. On September 1, 2014, Superego will return for a fourth spectacular season. While past seasons have seen episodes arrive on a monthly basis, Season Four will dole out these ear-candies more slowly, prolonging the utter majesty.

But wait, there’s another half of it. Beginning August 1st, we’re also dropping lap-loads of bonus content your way.

You’ll see the release of two new Behind The Bonus episodes, showcasing several sketches that until now, have been locked deep in the Superego vault. Case studies featuring Erinn HayesJames UrbaniakJohn Hodgman, and more. And in the coming weeks, point your eyeballs toward our YouTube page for a series of never-before-released Superego Supershorts.

But really, here’s the whole of it. When September rolls around, get ready for a bevy of brand new guests as well as the return of some your favorites: Andy DalyColin HanksThomas Lennon, and none other than Neko Case.

That’s it, you Bunch-Ofs. Stay subscribed on iTunes, follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and love us in real life.

-The B’s in Apartment 23.

I am standing and cheering and weeping and throwing flowers and small rubber cars and singing show tunes with joy. 

Siri, hard at work.

Siri, hard at work.

Repeat ELEVEN MILLION TIMES or until dead. 

Repeat ELEVEN MILLION TIMES or until dead. 

5 Fruits and Veggies You’ve Been Eating Wrong


You’ve been deep-frying lettuce. Why?


You swallow avocados whole. Just stop it! 


You smother ripe peaches in cheese sauce. You’re an awful person.


Quit jamming figs up your ass! (You know who you are)


Artichoke pudding?  No wonder God hates you.

5 Fruits and Veggies You’ve Been Eating Wrong

  1. You’ve been deep-frying lettuce. Why?

  2. You swallow avocados whole. Just stop it!

  3. You smother ripe peaches in cheese sauce. You’re an awful person.

  4. Quit jamming figs up your ass! (You know who you are)

  5. Artichoke pudding?  No wonder God hates you.

hodgman:

Please note, cable television subscribers, I am also in a TV premiere this week. I will be telling you more about it on July 17, when MARRIED premieres. It is very fun. Unlike GOING DEEP WITH DAVID REES, I do make some money on this show, but I have already been paid, so believe me when I say:

This is a really funny show, and Nat and Judy and Brett and Jenny are my favorites. 

That is all. 

witsradio:

splitsider:

Behold the first video from Weird Al’s Mandatory Fun album.

Oh yes.
Featuring our friends Aisha Tyler, Kristen Schaal and Margaret Cho (and Jack Black and Eric Stonestreet, who are also pretty rad).

witsradio:

splitsider:

Behold the first video from Weird Al’s Mandatory Fun album.

Oh yes.

Featuring our friends Aisha Tyler, Kristen Schaal and Margaret Cho (and Jack Black and Eric Stonestreet, who are also pretty rad).

Tonight is the premiere of GOING DEEP WITH DAVID REES. In the spirit of his book How to Sharpen Pencils, David’s show promises to be a close reading of seemingly simple practices, sure to be instructional and funny as all hell.  

David has a truly singular comic gift and a fierce dedication to whatever he does.  A couple years ago on Twitter I mentioned to him that I hadn’t been hearing enough from him lately, and there and then he pledged to leave a message on my phone every day for a month.  

And he did.

You cannot help but love a man like this. He’s part Carl Sagan, part Buster Keaton, and I hope you watch his show tonight on Nat Geo.  

7 Mistakes You’re Making with Olive Oil


Shampooing your dog with it.


Pouring it on Lord Denethor and lighting him on fire.


Trying to use it as currency.


Carrying it in a gallon freezer bag and telling people it’s your nephew Walt.


Freezing it in the shape of olives.


Dressing like Popeye and trying to have sex with it.


Using it as a metaphor to describe Johnny Fontaine’s hair to Tom Hagen.

7 Mistakes You’re Making with Olive Oil

  1. Shampooing your dog with it.

  2. Pouring it on Lord Denethor and lighting him on fire.

  3. Trying to use it as currency.

  4. Carrying it in a gallon freezer bag and telling people it’s your nephew Walt.

  5. Freezing it in the shape of olives.

  6. Dressing like Popeye and trying to have sex with it.

  7. Using it as a metaphor to describe Johnny Fontaine’s hair to Tom Hagen.